Jack Beal's lithographs shown below involve the oil and water don't mix" factor, but some of his prints, such as Morning Meadow and Landscape with Gate and Still Life with Angels Jack drew with liquid tusches. Some of these greasy tusches have been mixed with solvents and some diluted with water, and they may have been poured on freely or dry brushed or they may have been rubbed and scumbled or scraped or scratched. These drawing materials and processes can produce beautiful intermediate grays and fascinating textures, but they are at times somewhat unpredictable and can print darker than they appear on the stone or they can be weakened and or burned out entirely. This means that it was very useful that Jack had been willing to develop his own technical knowledge of the lithographic processes. It also means that making a lithograph is a collaborative relationship between an artist and the printer. The printer needs extra attention and patience and sensitivity to keep things under control. Jack did his share of experimenting on these lithographs, just as he did with his etchings, but he has always placed his creative and expressive goals ahead of technique. Jack and the printer shared a common purpose.

Note: The thumbnail images below have been cropped for this index page and are not all presented in the same scale. You may select any of the images below to see the full print, printing data and information about the making of the print.

  Clouds

Clouds

  Clouds (White on Black)

Clouds (White on Black)

  Morning Meadow

Morning Meadow

  Morning Meadow (White on Black)

Morning Meadow (White on Black)

  Spotted Salamander

Spotted Salamander

  Spotted Salamander (Hand-Colored)

Spotted Salamander (Hand-Colored)

  Chapel

Chapel

  For Christopher

For Christopher

  Still-Life With Angels

Still-Life With Angels

  Holstein and Burdock

Holstein and Burdock

  From Epano

From Epano

  Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

  Landscape With Gate

Landscape With Gate